Combat Learning
Combat Learning: Science for Better Martial Arts Training
Task Simplification & Representative Learning Tools for Judo & Beyond w/ Cal Jones
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Task Simplification & Representative Learning Tools for Judo & Beyond w/ Cal Jones

Today I'm joined by Cal Jones, a 5th dan in Judo and one of the most qualified Judo coaches in the UK, especially Wales. In this episode, Cal Jones fills in some gaps with how to use the constraints-led approach for martial arts, specifically grappling sports. First, he walks us through a system of understanding and controlling the degrees of representative learning design. This is a tool from an academic paper he's in the process of publishing with a research journal. Then Cal walks us through task simplification and how to teach Judo throws to beginners with minimal instruction and no reps or drills. Of note here is his discussion on how you use constraints and why you should never "overconstrain." While many people think that CLA is about "just doing jabs" or "just going for arm bars," that's actually not how CLA is supposed to work because it creates unrealistic behaviors. Also of interest, Cal even reveals that he doesn't teach breakfalls -- and there are big Judo teachers who aren't ecological who also don't teach breakfalls either. He also addresses how he conducts safe warmups in a dynamic and game-like fashion. And we even sneak in a short discussion on memory in the Ecological Dynamics theory. So if you're excited to jump in, hit the subscribe button on your podcatcher and enjoy the show. --- Join the email list now: combatlearning.com/newsletter --- Find Cal Jones: Twitter: https://twitter.com/CalJonesJudo --- Produced by Micah Peacock Intro Theme by Micah Peacock Outro Music is Synergy by Juche

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Combat Learning
Combat Learning: Science for Better Martial Arts Training
Combat Learning is about radically improving you as a teacher and learner of martial arts using the ecological dynamics and constraints-led approach to training. We explore the little-known frontiers of skill adaptation, perceptual-motor learning, and performance science for combat sports such as jiu jitsu, kickboxing, taekwondo, karate, muay thai, and more.